Peperonata Rustica, a Rustic Peperonata

Peperonata, Stewed Peppers

Peperonata, Stewed Peppers

Peperonata is stewed peppers, and there are innumerable variations on the theme. This  one is from the Pianura della Versilia, the coastal plain north of Pisa, and is drawn from Mariù Salvatori Zuliani’s excellent book, “La Cucina di Versilia e Garfagnana.”

Like many Italian recipes it is long on text and short on quantities:

Take bell peppers of a variety of colors, seed them, and rib them. Thinly slice one or two onions, depending upon the number of peppers, and blanch, peel, seed, and crumble a couple of tomatoes. Mince and sauté a little bit of the onion in olive oil, and when it begins to brown add the remaining onion and the peppers. Cook covered for a few minutes over a medium flame, just long enough for the peppers and onion to wilt without browning. At this point remove the cover and cook, stirring gently, until the liquid evaporates. Next, add the crumbled tomatoes; when they have wilted but aren’t completely cooked the peperonata is ready: You’ll end up with a dish that’s somewhat cooked and somewhat raw, and which can be eaten hot, as a side dish, or spread cold over slices of toasted bread as a snack.

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Categories: Antipasti and Starters, Bell Peppers, Tuscan Side Dishes

Author:Cosa Bolle in Pentola

Italy boasts an astonishing number of varietals, denominations, and wines, and tremendous changes are sweeping the land. New wines are being created, new DOCs are being introduced, and the existing denominations are overhauling their regulations both to reflect the practices adopted by their member wineries and to favor improvements in quality. Even the most staid and stolid region can flower seemingly overnight, emerging with exciting new wines and wineries that require rewriting the enological maps and rethinking one's positions. And, of course, recipes too, because cuisine and wine are closely intertwined and it's difficult to imagine one without the other.

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